Special Issue

Innovations in Soil Spectroscopy

About this Special Issue

Analysing soils by optical spectroscopic methods benefits from little sample preparation and a simultaneous determination of a suite of soil attributes from one scan, which both has contributed to establish vis-NIR and MIR spectroscopy as efficient laboratory and, in recent years, field-applicable methods. An optimized use of soil spectroscopy is tied to, for example, technical advancements in the field of sensor development, adequate soil sampling strategies (2D and 3D), the advancement of chemometric methods by new algorithms, the blending and synoptic use of different sensor data and the application of soil spectral libraries.
Furthermore, optical spectroscopic analysis is a promising tool to tackle new emerging demands such as soil contamination with microplastic. On the other hand, attempts to identify soil functions such as soil microbial activities require a critical review.

The Special Issue on 'Innovations in Soil Spectroscopy' thus brings together researchers from different disciplines working on the latest research on optical soil spectroscopy. Co-Edited by Professor Michael Vohland, Professor Thomas Udelhoven and Professor Sören Thiele-Bruhn, the Special Issue is focused on the progress made in the past decade in this field as well as on new insights and future perspectives of all facets of soil spectroscopy mentioned above.

The Special Issue solicits forward-looking contributions, reviews, mini-reviews, and original research that describe the latest research contributions to this field and give insight in the greatest challenges currently existing and how to address these challenges for future innovations.


Keywords: soil spectroscopy, soil, soil science, spectroscopy, MIR spectroscopy, soil contamination


Analysing soils by optical spectroscopic methods benefits from little sample preparation and a simultaneous determination of a suite of soil attributes from one scan, which both has contributed to establish vis-NIR and MIR spectroscopy as efficient laboratory and, in recent years, field-applicable methods. An optimized use of soil spectroscopy is tied to, for example, technical advancements in the field of sensor development, adequate soil sampling strategies (2D and 3D), the advancement of chemometric methods by new algorithms, the blending and synoptic use of different sensor data and the application of soil spectral libraries.
Furthermore, optical spectroscopic analysis is a promising tool to tackle new emerging demands such as soil contamination with microplastic. On the other hand, attempts to identify soil functions such as soil microbial activities require a critical review.

The Special Issue on 'Innovations in Soil Spectroscopy' thus brings together researchers from different disciplines working on the latest research on optical soil spectroscopy. Co-Edited by Professor Michael Vohland, Professor Thomas Udelhoven and Professor Sören Thiele-Bruhn, the Special Issue is focused on the progress made in the past decade in this field as well as on new insights and future perspectives of all facets of soil spectroscopy mentioned above.

The Special Issue solicits forward-looking contributions, reviews, mini-reviews, and original research that describe the latest research contributions to this field and give insight in the greatest challenges currently existing and how to address these challenges for future innovations.


Keywords: soil spectroscopy, soil, soil science, spectroscopy, MIR spectroscopy, soil contamination


Issue Editors

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Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Special Issue via the following journals:

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Issue Editors

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Participating Journals

Manuscripts can be submitted to this Special Issue via the following journals:

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